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Music Clips

Tom Salvatori
02/07/2017
Alice Cooper

Story

Ballad of Dwight Fry Suite (Arr. for Nylon String Guitars)

Second Coming / Ballad of Dwight Fry / Sun Arise

Total Time: 13:29

A handful of the most impressionable pieces of music I enjoyed from my youth - from Alice Cooper's 'Love it to Death' album released in 1971. I always considered Side 2 of the album among the most expressive and wide ranging emotional rock songs at the time and ranked them in my all time favorites.

It was a real pleasure to immerse myself in this body of work over the past several months! 

Project started: Nov 26, 2016
Final Mix: January 23, 2017

45 Separate Guitar Parts were recorded to compile this Suite. All Guitar parts and all percussive effects were recorded on my 1972 Hernandis Grade #1 Classical Guitar (which I love to say worked out to be the perfect 'period instrument' for the performance of this suite!)

Actually I must say things got a little creepy late at night trying to musically interpret a little girl's voicing of concern over her father's bout with insanity "Mommy, where's Daddy? He's been gone for so long..." and then again trying to make musical sense out of Alice himself going insane in the Ballad of Dwight Fry...repeatedly screaming "I gotta get out of here." So what started out as a fun idea turned into a lot of hard work just to musically interpret spoken word and screaming; not to mention the perfectly 'out of tune' guitar solo by Glen Buxton which is still, 46 years later, soooo fittingly uncomfortable; so wrong but soooo right, especially when the protagonist of the song (lead singer Alice Cooper), suffering from the nausea of insanity, was musically fitted for a straight jacket and dragged into the residency of an insane asylum. 

Salute to Alice Cooper and a tip of the top hat to him and his band with this one. I hope you not only enjoy discovering this piece as an instrumental, but if you're not familiar with the original work, please do seek it out. The songs are iconic and rate as highly recommended on my list of favorites. Thanks for listening!!

- Tom, 1/26/2017

Tom Salvatori
08/20/2016
Steve Howe

Story

This track is featured on 'Parlour Favorites'

Soooooo excited to announce my new solo nylon string guitar album release 'Parlour Favorites' - featuring my new compositions, but - even more interestingly and challengingly - I perform a small handful of works by my favorite and what I consider my most influential artists...Jan Akkerman of Focus, Robert Fripp of King Crimson, Steve Hackett of Genesis and last but not least, Steve Howe of YES. I've been shying away from recording my "The Ancient - Mood for a Day" medley for well over 4 decades because of its difficulty level, but I have now slayed that dragon! Coming in at 6:37 it is the final track on this album and I'm falling all over myself to call it EPIC, but I won't...let's just say at the very least I am pleased with it, which is saying a lot!! It is now available for Yes fans to pour over, comment and scrutinize, and for me a great relief to finally have it out there. Quietly Enjoy!!

Tom Salvatori
08/20/2016
Steve Hackett

Story

This track is featured on 'Parlour Favorites'

Tom Salvatori
08/20/2016
Steve Hackett

Story

This track is featured on 'Parlour Favorites'

Tom Salvatori
08/20/2016
Tom Salvatori

Story

This track is featured on 'Parlour Favorites'

Tom Salvatori
08/20/2016
Tom Salvatori

Story

This track is featured on 'Parlour Favorites'

Tom Salvatori
09/30/2013
Tom Salvatori

Story

This track is featured on 'A Year in the Life'

Tom Salvatori
09/30/2013
Tom Salvatori

Story

This track is featured on 'A Year in the Life'

'Head Fake, Low Shot' was composed during the Stanley Cup Finals in June, 2010, and named in tribute to my favorite hockey team, the Chicago Blackhawks, and to memorialize Patrick Kane's slight of hand and mind as he wove the magic web of success by scoring the most memorable Cup-winning goals ever against Philadelphia.  

Tom Salvatori
2013
Tom Salvatori

Story

This track is featured on 'A Year in the Life'

Tom Salvatori
2013
Tom Salvatori

Story

This track is featured on 'A Year in the Life'

Tom Salvatori
2013
Tom Salvatori

Story

This track is featured on 'A Year in the Life'

Tom Salvatori
Tom Salvatori

Story

This track is featured on 'Ever Ever On'

"The Ghosts of Levigliani" - composed while in Italy in September, 2003:

We were staying with relatives at the Albergo Raffaello, nestled beautifully in the small mountain village of Levigliani. We were in Levigliani to celebrate the first-ever reunion of our Italian and American families at a luncheon feast that went on and on (and on) through at least 6 courses and twice as many vino toasts and speeches in both Italian and English. Our hostess (and Italian relatives) Ghilberta and her sons Marcello and Favio masterfully prepared and served an Italian feast second to none.

Then, later on, after receiving our hotel room keys, I found out through casual conversation with Marcello and Favio that my particular hotel room was known to be haunted. This little golden nugget of knowledge was passed along to me just before we were all planning to retire for the evening. I, of course, became keenly inquisitive, but Marcello and Favio just looked at each other, shrugged their shoulders, and passed off my inquiries as if haunted rooms were commonplace in Italy. I was barely able to muster their acknowledgement that at least all ghosts in Italy are friendly...which wound up doing very little to ease my overactive imagination.

In the middle of the night, all of Italy suffered an electricity blackout (and there's no telling why a blackout should be noticed by sleeping people in the first place) and of course, I was awakened - startled. I must have been a bit nervous with the stories of ghosts getting the best of me. Others in the hotel were roused out of bed by the blackout as well, and things were definitely going bump in the night - one humorous fact we found out later was that my cousin Gina awoke and started packing and dragging her luggage around thinking it was time to get up and catch the tour bus. Hence things going bump in the night!

Since I was wide awake at 3:30 am, I sat up by the window looking out over the eerily silent mountain village in the moonlight...with my guitar in hand - and started to tinker. And then all at once, I played a melody line on the guitar in its entirety as if I had always known it...it struck me as uncanny...like it had already been composed. And when I played the melody - and because of the extreme silence due to the blackout - through the half-open window I could hear its echo coming back as a delayed response, which added a haunting element to the piece. My new melody resonated so well with me (and the echo) that I committed it to memory, playing it often...which is what I do to keep it in mind since I'm not adept at writing out sheet music.

I finally had a chance to record the guitar piece in 2008. After recording the guitar part, I forwarded it to John Catchings, our string arranger, in 2009. When I introduced the piece and the background story to John, he really took it to heart and captured the echo "call and response" elements in the string arrangement - which I think fits well and completes my overall vision of the piece. John also playfully kept the ghostly spirit of the piece alive with the pizzicato elements in the strings - which certainly sound like ghosts tiptoeing around in the dark - at least to me!

So "The Ghosts of Levigliani" took almost seven years to become a fully realized guitar and chamber string ensemble piece. I wasn't in much of a hurry because my new friends who guided my creative efforts on this piece - the ghosts - are timeless anyway! The piece now exists in a wonderful form that communicates very well the haunting creative experience I had in Levigliani very late on that memorable September evening back in 2003.

Enjoy!

Tom Salvatori
Tom Salvatori

Story

This track is featured on 'Ever Ever On'

The piece is a trio (classical guitar, cello and oboe). It was composed to musically depict the visual elements of the art lithograph by M.C. Escher entitled “Relativity.”

The movement of the musical motif centers around ascending and descending scales that move both up and down (like the staircases in the artwork) and then arrive at different thematic elements in the music (like the various plateaus).

Tom Salvatori
Tom Salvatori

Story

This track is featured on 'Ever Ever On'

Mike (brother and producer) once mentioned that to me that John Catching's arrangement on Labyrinth II (When Evening Falls) 'made his teeth hurt.' Well, when I played this one for him, he looked ready to toss his cookies...I found him in the corner of the studio, curled up in the fetal position, trying to tear his ears to shreds. Just kidding :) 

John's trio of cellos does work with this piece!  Just what the doctor ordered. Sure, you can go to bed tonight...but I dare you to listen to this piece with your eyes closed!

Let Iris have her pretty world. I want to keep them guessing for centuries!

HOO HA AHAHAHHOOHAAAA!!!!!!!!

Tom Salvatori
Tom Salvatori

Story

This track is featured on 'When Evening Falls'

Tom Salvatori
Tom Salvatori

Story

This track is featured on 'When Evening Falls'

Tom Salvatori
Tom Salvatori

Story

This track is featured on 'When Evening Falls'

Presented in three entwined themes, Reflecting Absence is a contemporary classical guitar composition by Tom Salvatori and offered as a musical depiction of the terror attacks specifically directed at the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001. The piece features Salvatori as the guitarist accompanied by cellist John Catchings and bassist Craig Nelson. It is named in honor of Michael Arad’s compellingly beautiful architectural design selected to be the centerpiece of the National September 11 Memorial and Museum at the WTC site.

Reflecting Absence:

1. Around Corners - portrays the dark secrets that the terrorists had in mind as they waited in queue to board their flights

(0:01-0:41) Understated, melancholic and pleading theme musically depicts the first group of terrorists arriving at the airport to board flight AA11

(0:42-1:14) Variation on the initial theme is used to illustrate the second group of terrorists arriving at the airport to board flight UA17

2. Towers Toll - reflects on the act of terrorism as the hijacked airplanes hit their targets...the immediate effect and the aftermath endured

(1:15-1:43) Guitar strumming motif and cello characterizes the sound of the jet engines and tension in the air as the hijacked American flight attacks the North Tower

(1:44-2:16) Guitar rasgueado technique and cello presents increased tension in the air as the hijacked United flight made its approach to attack the South Tower

(2:17-3:01) ...for whom the bell tolls…this devastatingly sad solo guitar figure renders the eerie silence that must have been heard up in the Towers after the crashes occurred; with the uncomfortable bended note of the classical guitar calling to mind the gut-wrenching decision of those choosing to step off Tower’s edge

3. Fireside Chat - Represents families gathered in living rooms across America as the events of the day delivered more questions than answers in the uneasy shadows of the evening hours

(3:02-4:28) Call and response interplay between the guitar and cello musically illustrates family discourse to try to understand the hate behind the attacks

(4:29-5:04) A reprise of the Towers Toll strumming motif…this time slowly finger picked in paled, muted comparison...with the intent to be a musical reminder to never allow the memory of these barbaric acts of war fade. The cello soars freely and melodically above the guitar to represent the raising of the lost souls from the site

(5:05-6:39) More discourse call and response...this time with bass entering the piece to musically represent the ‘beating of the war drums’ to portray the coalition commitment to uproot the axis of evil, its terrorists, their leaders and those who harbor them

(6:40-6:51) A guitaristic tribute of two light harmonic notes and their ensuing overtones ascending quietly to symbolize the twin columns of blue light beamed into the sky above New York during the religious and memorial services held March 11, 2002 and on subsequent September 11 anniversaries

Tom Salvatori
Tom Salvatori

Story

This track is featured on 'When Evening Falls'

Tom Salvatori
Tom Salvatori

Story

This track is featured on 'Late Night Guitar'

Tom Salvatori
Tom Salvatori

Story

This track is featured on 'Late Night Guitar'

Tom Salvatori
Tom Salvatori

Story

This track is featured on 'Late Night Guitar'

Tom Salvatori
1998
Tom Salvatori

Story

This track is featured on 'Whispering for Your Attention'

Tom Salvatori
1998
Tom Salvatori

Story

This track is featured on 'Whispering for Your Attention'

Tom Salvatori
1998
Tom Salvatori

Story

This track is featured on 'Whispering for Your Attention'

Tom Salvatori
08/27/2015
Tom Salvatori

Story

This track is featured on 'Sketches'

Tom Salvatori
08/27/2015
Tom Salvatori

Story

This track is featured on 'Sketches'

Tom Salvatori
08/27/2015
Tom Salvatori

Story

This track is featured on 'Sketches'

Tom Salvatori
08/27/2015
Tom Salvatori

Story

This track is featured on 'Sketches'

Tom Salvatori, with guest vocals by Massimo Di Nocera
11/18/2008
Tom Salvatori

Story

This track is featured on 'Tu Sei bella Aci Catena' - EP

Tu Sei bella Aci Catena - November, 2008

Tom Salvatori – guitar

Leroy Bocchieri – mandolin

Massimo Di Nocera – vocals

Tu sei bella Aci Catena

 My parents rented a villa in Sicily for two months at the end of 2008, and my wife and I went to visit and celebrate our anniversary in Italy. It soon became evident that the only way to navigate in the little towns was to drive there and then ask the locals for directions. And for some reason, one Italian talking to a driver through a car window seemed irresistible to others...we always attracted a few to render their opinion. They'd point in different directions, shrug their shoulders, wave their arms and ultimately start an argument amongst themselves. We would still see the assembled group continuing the discussion in our rear view mirror even after we'd start on our way.

The smartest of all direction-givers was a woman in a small town we had a hard time finding - called Aci Catena. When we stopped, she came out her front door (which was about one yard away from the street) in a bright pink bathrobe, largely pregnant; with kids hanging on her from all sides. She smiled and said “go four streets straight ahead and when you get there...stop again and ask someone else!”

Anyway...having a composer riding shotgun alongside an Italian crooner at the wheel who fancies himself Mario Lanza, we eventually began to sing a little melody to the beautiful words of directions as we drove about. Our music and lyrics have now become the testament to this wonderful Sicilian experience. 

Lyrics

In Italian:                                                        English translation:


Tu sei bella Aci Catena                                 You are beautiful Aci Catena

Aci Catena buon giorno                                Aci Catena good day!
Benvenuti ‘la nostra citta                             Welcome to our city
Dove il centro il mercato                              Where is the central market?
Noi stiam’ guidando in cerchio...                    We are driving in circles…

Prima ‘vanti, gira la sinistra                          First go ahead, then turn left
Quindi si va, ‘la chiesa                                Then you go on from church
Quindi destra, quindi la sinistra                     Then right, then left
Gira l’ang’lo, la chiesa                                 Turn the corner, at the church

Aci Catena aiuto mi                                    Aci Catena…help me!
Aci Catena aiuto mi                                    Aci Catena…help me!
Dove il centro il mercato                             Where is the central market?
Noi stiam’ guidando in cerchio...                    We are driving in circles…

‘ndare l'ang’lo, gira la sinistra                       Go to the corner, turn left
Quindi destra, ‘la chiesa                              Then right, at the church
Gira destra, gira sinistra                              Turn right, turn left
Gira l'ang’lo, ‘la chiesa                                Turn the corner, at the church

Aci Caten’ arrivederci                                  Aci Catena goodbye!
Non abbiamo mai trovat’ il centro                  We never found the center
Preferisco perso in Sicilia                             I prefer to be lost in Sicily
‘nvece trovat’ altrove                                  Instead of being found elsewhere

Aci Catena tu sei bella                                Aci Catena you are beautiful

Tom Salvatori
1995
Tom Salvatori

Story

Track 6 - 'Under Cover of Darkness' CD 

Solo Guitar, recorded during thunderstorm

Tom Salvatori
1995
Michael Salvatori

Story

Track 3, 'Under Cover of Darkness' - CD

Solo Guitar, recorded during a thunderstorm